My almost 13 yr old girl wrote this & as the proud mama I had to share her talent w/ you guys. Enjoy!

 

 

Bright white lights are above me, and simple scratchy gray carpet is below me. I see a variety of legs, all wiggling and tapping in anticipation. Different races, ages, and genders surround me. We’re all here for one reason; the sickness. Muffled voices of babies sobbing, children complaining, and stressed sharp whispers of “hush” from the lips of mothers and fathers. All I hear in my mind is silence. The silence of a million thoughts racing through my head. 
 

      “Ferriday” A drab nurse in purple clown scrubs calls. Clowns always scared me, so I figured “This is a great Omen, ay Charlotte?” Nurse “Pattie Sue” led me into room 16. I sat on the Table, the brown paper crinkling and stinking of anesthetic. As I looked around the room, I saw water color paintings of flowers and posters of the skeletal system. “What seems to be the problem?” Nurse Patti Sue Questioned me. “I’ve been dizzy, nauseated, and my vision is fuzzy.” I whispered, because I was afraid of the questions that followed. 
 

      “Do you live in an outbreak area?” She asked. “Yes. We’ve had 4 die, and 12 are so infected they can’t even walk or talk.” I replied shakily. “Let’s run some blood tests for DRB.” The nurse sighed. DRB is a brain infection that’s sweeping the northern hemisphere right now. It starts out as a headache, then progresses quickly and almost without any warning signs, until the 2nd week. Then the infected slowly lose all ability to move or communicate. They can’t socialize; they can’t even breathe without an aid. It’s more common in teenagers, especially girls. Death is worse than this fate. But the worst: There isn’t a cure.  
 

      Annslie thought she was getting headaches from the day before when she’d fallen during soccer practice. Then 3 days later, she was so nauseous she wouldn’t get up from bed. Annslie fell asleep, and never woke up. I never said goodbye to my best friend. 
 

      I hardly felt the needle prick into my arm. My entire body was numb from remembering Annslie. I had a choice between a cookie and a clown band-aid. I chose the cookie. Patti Sue taped it onto my arm over a swab of gauze. “These test results should be back in about 3 days.” Patti Sue said, and then put her hand on my shoulder “it’ll be okay Darlin’. It’ll be okay.” I ran out of that hospital as fast as my legs would take me, while I could still run. 
 

      Looking up at the clear blue skies, I was devastated. Comprehending that this might be one of the last times I will see my sky. My green grass. My orange leaves, twirling and falling to the ground. The wind seemed to whisper “Charlotte….Charlotte…..” I wanted to slow down. Soak up the sun, as if it will heal the infection I’ve caught. I find a simple bench to lay on. Bright Sunshine is above me, with fluffy dream-like clouds. Browning Green grass meets the edge of a cement sidewalk below me. My eyelids close, and I pray I’ll wake up.

3 Comments
  1. sadbutterfly 14 years ago

    Beautiful travesty, what an amazing girl she is. You are a good Mama, with a beautiful heart which your daughter has grown out of, you should be very proud. SB

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  2. bucklemunki 14 years ago

    wow..she’s very eloquent&her descriptive is top-notch.i don’t think this little girl will ever have a problem expressing herself!no wonder you feel so proud,D XX

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  3. bucklemunki 14 years ago

    wow..she’s very eloquent&her descriptive is top-notch.i don’t think this little girl will ever have a problem expressing herself!no wonder you feel so proud,D XX

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